careerASSESSMENT report


prepared for

Name Surname



career self-assessment exercises completed on
01 Sep 2004
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online career assessment centre

 
 
Table of Contents
 
Introduction
 
Assessment Results
1. Your careerValues
2. Your careerMotivators
3. Your careerTalents
4. Your careerPreferences
5. Your careerProfile Summary
6. Using your careerAssessment profile
 
© career analysts ltd
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Introduction

 

Your careerAssessment report is designed to help you review your current employment situation, assess your skills,  talents, values and motivators and provide you with a tool for mapping your future career vision, as well as providing reality checks and action planning worksheets to enable you to take realistic steps towards a more rewarding and fulfilling career.  The online careerAssessment Centre’s major purpose is to help you to make informed and considered decisions about where you want to go in your career and how best to get there.

 

The careerAssessment report analyses your ideas, and preferences and provides a means of structuring your thinking and a framework for a thorough evaluation of your career and future options.

 

It is over to you to use this as a resource to manage your future career.  We will provide you with worksheets and tasks that will help you identify your next steps, but the action required will be over to you.

 

We have made these initial steps in career exploration easy for you and using this report in a proactive manner will help you to be more in control of your career and where you are headed.  It  will also give you more focus in your immediate working life.

 

Our careerASSESSMENT analysis:

·    identifies your unique skill-set

·    identifies your level of motivation for using a wide variety of skills

·    clarifies skills you can develop for the future

·    helps you build your Ideal Job Profile which can be communicated to employers / consultancies

·    enables you to identify skills and personal values which should be marketed through your CV/resume and career enhancement campaign

·    identifies areas of work that you may like to minimise or avoid in future work opportunities

·    provides tools for incorporating your careerASSESSMENT into your future career strategy.

 

Your use of this report will help you be in more control of your future and achieve:

·    a challenging and rewarding worklife

·    a sense of achievement through defining your own definition of success

·    increased self-confidence through an understanding of your strengths, talents and potential contributions

·    an enhanced capacity to become all that you could be.

 

An important step to expanding your career horizons is to identify your primary values, interests, motivators and talents.  The information you gain from this analysis, will isolate what abilities you want to emphasize in your future work.  You will gain a vocabulary which allows you to communicate to others what you are looking for and what you have to offer.  While you will need to integrate your careerASSESSMENT analysis with your personal situation and constraints to crystallise your career goals, you will have the foundation for marketing yourself effectively.  There are real payoffs for you and your employers in that by channelling your motivated talents into your work you will gain enhanced personal satisfaction, as well as greater likelihood of enjoying what you are doing and being more productive.

 


Your career analysis reveals your natural motivations and talent for work. When your job matches your true motivations, work seems easier and is more fulfilling. The purpose of this process is to help you build a career in which you will be most motivated, satisfied and productive.  

 

Now let’s review all those things that you have defined as being important to you and your future career.

© career analysts ltd
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Your careerVALUES

Introduction

You have taken the first step in clarifying your values and increasing your chances of aligning your work with your values.  However, this process is an ongoing one and is highly individual.  It takes time, energy and reflection. 

 

Following you will find a matrix highlighting your values from most preferred through to those least preferred.  All will have relevance for your future career.  You have effectively prioritised those things that are most important to you in your work and in your life.  But, the process should not finish here.  We have also included some worksheets and activities that will enable you to further clarify your values in the future.  Values can be seen as a sensitivity and awareness to ongoing choices that we have every day, to either live up to and enhance our values, or to move further from them. These continual choices can strengthen our values.

 
Your personal values

  Personal Value Description
1 Authenticity Expressing oneself in a manner which is true to you
2 Compassion Awareness and sympathy for the plight of others, and a desire to help.
3 Confidence Being full of assurance, conveying capability to others
4 Individuality Having a sense of your own person
5 Integrity Behaving in accordance with values and ethics
 

Using your careerVALUES

 

Core values are fundamental beliefs that are well-developed and have probably been part of your character for years.  When you do something that contradicts these values, your intuition, or gut feeling, will serve as a reminder that something isn’t right.

 

Unarticulated or undefined values can leave us feeling rootless.  We drift without an anchor and often question our self-worth. When people are unaware of their personal values – and the vast majority are – we can find ourselves playing roles and constantly trying to meet the expectations of others.

 

Synergy and flow are two words that describe any process moving effortlessly forwards. When your work, life activities and goals are in synch with your core values, there is no internal conflict holding you back – this creates an energy surge that can effortlessly lead you towards greater success and goal accomplishment.

 

If we ignore what is truly important to us – we ignore our greatest source of power.  When we fill our lives with activities and attitudes that are congruent with our values, we gain considerable satisfaction and can achieve great things (all by our own definition of success of course). 

 

 

© career analysts ltd
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Your careerVALUES

By assessing your most important careerValues you have created your own definition of success or what is most important to you in your career. The items in your Most Valued column below are your blueprint or set of criteria for what is most important in your career.
 
Career values

Most Valued Often Valued Moderately Valued Rarely Valued Least Valued
Artistic Creativity

Earnings Potential

Independence

Appreciation

Balance

Creative Input

Entrepreneurialism

Fun

Influence

Advancement

Challenge

Contribution

Environmental Awareness

Friendships

Innovation

Achievement

Clarity

Competition

Excitement

Freedom

Accountability

Community

Expertise

Leading Edge Development

Learning

Location / environment

Meaning

Pace and Productivity

People Contact

Physical Skills

Precision

Predictability

Pressure

Professional Reputation

Profit

Quality

Results

Security

Service

Teamwork

Time Alone

Tranquility

Variety

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What next?

 

It is all very well, having clarified your values, it is how you use this information from here, which will impact on your career and life satisfaction.  It is how you integrate these values into your daily working and personal life which will add significantly to your personal satisfaction.

 

We have therefore created a series of Worksheets using your careerVALUES which you can use to make steps to immediately improve your working life.

 
Worksheet1: Current Job Match

In the worksheet below, you will find your most important values appearing in the left hand column. We would now like you to evaluate to what extent those values are being met in your current work. In other words, if you have Expertise as a top value, is this something which you are able to use or extend in your current role? Another example could be the value "location": if this was important to you we would now like you to assess whether your current job meets your requirements in relation to location.
Please circle your level of satisfaction of your top values using the following rating scale:
Low satisfaction 1 to High Satisfaction 10
 
Please circle
Career Values  
Low High
Artistic Creativity Engage in creative work in any of several art forms 1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10
Earnings Potential Having the expectation of significant future earnings 1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10
Independence Be free from the influence or control of others 1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10
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Last word on careerVALUES

 

Taking time to clarify our values is one of the most critical things we can do. Our careerVALUES make a contribution to our motivation for certain jobs and work roles. We also know that most people would like to find work that improves their skills, stretches their abilities and allows them to accomplish tasks competently. In general they also seek an element of self determination in their work. They want to be able to have a say in how things are done and to make significant contribution to their organisations. But another important part of the motivation equation is an individual’s desire for a preferred work environment or a particular type of organisation.

 

These preferences are usually the result of personal values and can be an important aspect of career motivation. They influence how we feel about different types of work and different types of organisation. The more congruence there is between your values and motives and those of the organisation, the more satisfaction you are likely to experience. However, values do sometimes change with time and unlike personality and interests, can change dramatically. 

 

They affect different people in different ways, so it’s for you to decide how important your values are. You might feel so strongly about your values that they help you limit the choices that you have. For instance, you might want to exercise creative values over and above anything else and so narrow your choices to areas you feel would be most in line with these values. Some people are able to put their values to one side temporarily in order to get the sort of training they need, e.g. delaying having work which is Morally Fulfilling such as working for a charity, until fully trained in accountancy and finance with large blue chip organisation, thus being better able to make a useful contribution in the long run.

 

If we ignore what is truly important to us – we ignore our greatest source of power.  When we fill our lives with activities and attitudes that are congruent with our values, we gain considerable satisfaction and can achieve great things (all by your own definition of success of course). 

© career analysts ltd
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Your careerMOTIVATORS Report

A Career Motivator is an inner force which determines what you want and need from your working life.  Your Career Motivators are derived from your drives, attitudes and values, and the talents and abilities that you personally hold or perceive yourself to hold. This force is a source of energy and direction which can focus your future career path.  Identifying your career motivator means that you have a clearer understanding of what really motivates or “drives” you at work and what path will most likely fit with your underlying motivator. 

"Your Career Motivators define your ideal future career path"


From analysis of your responses to the questionnaire, your career motivators were as follows:

 

Expertise   2.6
  Motivated to attain a high level of accomplishment in a specialized field
 
Influence   2.8
  Motivated by managerial influence and accountability
 
Independence   3
  Motivated by freedom and autonomy to make own decisions
 
Security   3.2
  Motivated by a solid and predictable future
 
Business Creation   4.2
  Motivated by innovation and business success
 
Contribution   3.2
  Motivated to make a contribution or make a difference to others
 
Challenge   4.8
  Motivated by the intellectual, physical or personal challenge from their work
 
Balance   3.2
  Motivated by a balanced work and lifestyle
 
Turn overleaf to see a brief description of all the motivators and a full description of your top two careerMotivators.
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Your primary career motivator is:

Challenge

Motivated to solve problems and to challenge themselves to push limits

If your career motivator is pure challenge, what you would not give up is the opportunity to work on solutions to seemingly unsolvable problems, to win over tough opponents, or to overcome difficult obstacles. For you, the only meaningful reason for pursuing a career or job is that it permits you to take on challenges. Some people find such pure challenge in intellectual kinds of work, such as the engineer who likes to solve problems or work on difficult designs; some find challenge in complex multifaceted situations, such as the strategy consultant who works with clients facing difficult circumstances such as possible bankruptcy; some in interpersonal competition, such as the professional athlete or the salesperson who defines every opportunity as a challenge. Change, variety and difficulty become ends in themselves, and if something is easy it becomes immediately boring.

People motivated by Challenge...

  • Feel able to tackle any challenge.
  • Define success as overcoming impossible obstacles, solving unsolvable problems, or beating extremely tough opponents.
  • Seek increasingly tougher challenges.
  • Will work on problems in any area.
  • Relish ever more difficult strategic assignments.
  • Often define life in competitive terms in which winning is everything.

The Challenge-motivated Individuals' Career Needs...

  • Feel the area of work, the employing organisation, the pay system, the promotion system, and the forms of recognition are all subordinate to the opportunities for self testing within the job.
  • Become bored and irritable in the absence of constant challenges.
  • Feel career variety is important.
  • Are sometimes attracted to general management because of the variety and intense challenge that managerial situations provide.
  • Are highly motivated towards self development.
  • Are likely to be very loyal to organisations that give adequate opportunities for self tests.
  • Can be single-minded and make life difficult for those with different aspirations.

Challenge-motivated individuals are fortunate, in that they can find opportunities in many career paths, and in fact may take on multiple career paths to give themselvs on-going challenges.  As these individuals tend to be highly motivated to extend their skills, capabilities and learning they can avidly apply themselves to new fields of interest to maintain their personal challenge.

The Challenge-motivated individual must constantly re-assess their goals and objectives, to ensure they have set themselves new challenges ahead.  These individuals can become particularly frustrated when a role or task becomes routine and easy.  It is important to take ownership of this need and to find other opportunities to extend yourself.  Learning opportunities, particularly demanding programmes that are combined with other commitments, can provide appropriate challenges and will lead to further opportunities and challenges in the future. Personal goal-setting is a primary skill for Challenge-driven individuals to focus their energies and drives.

Often looking to other areas of your life for new challenges is also appropriate. Some Challenge-driven individuals have been known to set themselves goals such as completing a 10K run, marathon or even iron-man competition or to take on roles outside of work that extend and challenge them, such as organising a community event.

The key concern for those driven by challenge is extending their capabilities.


Your secondary career motivator is:

Business Creation

Motivated to innovate and be identified with original output.

If your motivator is Business Creation, what you most desire is the opportunity create a product, organisation or enterprise of your own, built on your own abilities and your willingness to take risks and to overcome obstacles. You want to prove to the world that you can create an enterprise that is the result of your own effort. You may be working for others in an organisation while you are learning and assessing future opportunities, but you will go out on your own as soon as you feel you can manage it. You want your enterprise to be financially successful as proof of your abilities.

People motivated by Business Creation...

  • Have an overriding need to create new businesses, develop new products or services, build new organisations, or take over existing businesses and reshape them.
  • Have an urge specifically to create new organisations, products, or services that can be identified closely with their own efforts, that will survive on their own, and that will be economically successful.
  • See making money as a measure of success.
  • Typically begin to pursue entrepreneurial activities early in life, often starting small money-making enterprises while at school.
  • Have an extraordinarily high level of motivation - often derived from own family - to prove entrepreneurial skills to the world.
  • Do not stay with traditional organisations very long, or keep organisational job as a sideline while real energies go into building own enterprises.
  • Are obsessed with proving ability to create businesses which often means sacrificing autonomy and stability, particularly in the early stages.
  • May continually fail at entrepreneurism and spend career searching for creative solutions while making a living at a conventional job.

The Business Creator's Career Needs... 

  • Can be obsessed with the need to create, so may need to team up with others who are more practical in their approach.
  • Can be easily bored and may lose interest in a project once the initial stages are complete. Must build strategies that enable them to 'conclude and produce' on tasks and projects effectively.
  • May continue to invent new products or services in own enterprise or may lose interest, sell enterprise and start new one.
  • Can be restless, continually needing new creative challenges. May be advised to consider project or consulting roles within organisations to provide on-going opportunities for creativity without negatively impacting employment tenure through needing constant creative opportunities.

People with Business Creation as a career motivator do things which are distinctly different from those which others do, and they want to 'own' the results. The individuals name is closely associated with his or her products or outputs.

People driven by creativity derive excitement from breaking new ground. They’re stimulated by accomplishing something new and innovative.

The key concern of Business-creative individuals is innovation.


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Your next steps

… the practical implications of your career motivators.

Becoming more analytical and proactive about our work and career is important because no-one else can have responsibility for our life and career but ourselves. Our managers, colleagues and families may not have a clear understanding of what really motivates us and is important to us. We all need to have an understanding of what really drives us so that we can make choices that are consistent with those motivators and increase our chances of finding work that is satisfying and fulfilling for us. Working in alignment with our key motivators significantly impacts our satisfaction and ability to fully utilize our talents and capabilities.

Your career motivator is a reflection of your self-image, of what you excel in, and what you want and value. When reviewing your career motivators it is important to look also at your secondary motivators and your overall pattern of responses. The world of work is undoubtedly varied and complex. Different combinations of motivators can lead to different career choices, even within the same field of work.

an example...

So those driven by “Contribution” or “Expertise” may follow a different career path than those motivated by Influence even within the same profession. For example, Andy, Brian, and Claire are all artists by profession. However, when we look at their Career Motivators they are completely different. Andy, who is motivated by Business Creation has his own brand and has marketed his work internationally. Brian is motivated by Contribution so is involved in teaching art classes to under-privileged kids in the area and Claire who is motivated by Expertise is fascinated by new technology and processes and is continually experimenting with new techniques and processes to further her knowledge.

With career motivators, we can also find that we have people from diverse occupational groupings who share the same focus. There may be a lawyer, architect or process worker who all share the same “motivator” for “Contribution” for example. Just how you define Contribution will differ depending on your profession. Understanding your Career Motivator will help you define your future career path in a way that is in alignment with your fundamental motivator.

It is also important to understand our secondary motivator and our overall pattern of motivators to help us prioritise our decision-making and even to help us to know what to avoid in future opportunities. We need to learn to articulate and communicate our key concerns and motivators so that we can make choices that will increase the likelihood of obtaining what we really want and need from our work.

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Your careerTALENTS Analysis

Your skills and talents are vital to your future career success. What you like to do and what you are confident that you can do play an important role in your future career satisfaction and success. Your CareerTALENTS profiles your self-reported preferences and skills.

Introduction

Motivation is what we LIKE to do. Talent is what we DO well naturally. They can exist independently, but when they combine, they create something special. They create motivated talents. In the analysis, you were rating your skill and preference for a wide range of tasks and activities associated with many roles. The patterns and preferences evident below enable you to gain more focus in your career management. To enable you to understand what motivates you most and the talents that will be most fulfilling for you to maximise in your future career. The first step in using our career talents is to take a look at the broad categories of skills and tasks which were sampled.

 
Your Talents Matrix

Following is a visual representation of your responses on this matrix. This can be useful as a visual record of your preferences and as a starting point for documenting what you want more of and less of in your future career.

Your Motivation and Talent pattern is more important than your overall scores.  Look to see if there is a relationship between than which you enjoy and that which you are good at.  Similarly, there should be a similar correspondence between that which you have little interest or motivation for and those activities for which you little talent.

 

The Skills have been colour coded for your reflection as follows:

 

Pursue.  Your Motivation and Talent scores were both high so you should actively Pursue opportunities to use these skills in your work. You are attracted to these activities and confident in your ability to perform them well.  These Pursue areas should be the major focus of your career planning.

 

 Develop.  In this area your motivation score was high however, your talent score is lower. You should carefully review skills and tasks in this area for you to Develop.  You enjoy these activities but feel uncertain about your ability to perform them.  Further education, training or experience with these skills might lead to better performance and greater confidence,  or you may want to simply enjoy these areas as hobbies.

 

 Explore.  When your Talent score is high and your Motivation score is lower, this is a possible area for you to Explore.  You are confident of your ability to perform these activities, but you do not enjoy them.  With some exploration, you may find a way to use your skills in other areas that appeal to you more.

 

 Avoid.  When your Motivation and Talent scores are both low, this is an area for you to Avoid.  You neither enjoy these activities nor feel confident in your ability to perform them.

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Talent Matrix Highly skilled Competent Little Or No Skill
Thoroughly Enjoy Using      
Enjoy Using Interpreting
Researching
 
Disciplining
Investigating
 
 
Like Using   Co-operating
Informing / Briefing
Creating Images
Tending Animals
Using Tools/machinery
Composing / performing with music
 
 
Prefer Not to Use   Observing
Writing
Preparing Food
 
Estimating
Classifying
 
Strongly Dislike Using     Selling
Liaising
Appraising
Influencing
Representing
Coaching
Motivating
Training
Counselling
Advising
Empathising
Handling Grievances
Negotiating
Presenting
Mediating
Interviewing
Planning
Implementing
Organising People
Organising Things
Deciding
Expediting
Directing
Supervising
Reviewing
Problem-Solving
Monitoring
Synthesizing
Budgetting
Editing
Maintaining Records
Checking
Analysing
Information Collecting
Calculating
Assessing
Designing
Generating Ideas
Perceive Intuitively
Visualising
Initiating Change
Entertaining
Building / Constructing
Using Mechanical Abilities
Transporting
Using Physical Skills
Planting, Cultivating
Using Manual Skills
Assembling
 
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Your Motivated Talents

Motivation is what we LIKE to do. Talent is what we DO well naturally. They can exist independently, but when they combine, they create something special. They create motivated talents. Your motivated talents have been identified as….


Your preferred skills in INTERPERSONAL / COMMUNICATION are:
These skills involve working with people, any interaction or information exchange between people
  Preference Talent
  Disciplining Providing warnings, communicating work standards 64% 65%

Your preferred skills in MANAGEMENT are:
These skills are associated with the management, organization and co-ordination of tasks, resources and people
  Preference Talent
  You did not identify any skill in this category    

Your preferred skills in INFORMATION PROCESSING are:
These skills involve working with information, including facts, figures, written documents, using thinking and computing skills
  Preference Talent
  Investigating Looking into, analyzing, studying information or situations 63% 64%
  Interpreting Understanding and translating rules, laws, agreements, statistics, art or languages 67% 68%
  Researching Study, investigate, apply theory, develop hypotheses, methods, results 77% 78%

Your preferred skills in the CREATIVE category are:
These skills involve using creativity, innovation. Working in a variety of mediums to express ideas or concepts
  Preference Talent
  You did not identify any skill in this category    

Your preferred skills in the PHYSICAL / PRACTICAL category are:
These skills involve working with things and the physical environment; using your hands and body skilfully
  Preference Talent
  You did not identify any skill in this category    

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Areas for Development

In this section, we have identified those skills in which you have considerable interest, but less confidence in using.  These are the talents for you to develop further.  This will be high pay-off for you to develop because of their appeal to you, the more skill and confidence you develop the more likely you are to enjoy using your skill / talent.  From an employers point of view, these should be areas which are worth investing further in you, because of the appeal to you, you are more likely to be most motivated and satisfied  if developing and further using this talent.

Your high pay-off skills for development were….

preference      talent

INTERPERSONAL / COMMUNICATION
These skills involve working with people, any interaction or information exchange between people


MANAGEMENT
These skills are associated with the management, organization and co-ordination of tasks, resources and people


INFORMATION PROCESSING
These skills involve working with information, including facts, figures, written documents, using thinking and computing skills
Writing 77%
57%
Information Collecting 80%
54%
Calculating 86%
29%


the CREATIVE category
These skills involve using creativity, innovation. Working in a variety of mediums to express ideas or concepts


the PHYSICAL / PRACTICAL category
These skills involve working with things and the physical environment; using your hands and body skilfully


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Summary

Our talents are those things that come easily to us.  Naturally, we enjoy learning and using skills related to work that interests us.  We also prefer to learn skills for which we have a special aptitude or talent.  Skills are the expression of our interests and personal style which make up your unique marketable talents. 

Identifying your Preferred Skills and Competency Levels enables you to define the tasks and activities which will most satisfy you in your working life.  In essence you are virtually able to develop your own job-description. With the careerTALENT analysis you are given a tool for identifying your preferred tasks which can enable you to match your skills with possible job or career opportunities. This is in much the same was that we, as occupational psychologists use very similar tools to analyse jobs and then find people with skills to match.  So by making these same tools available, you can identify your unique mix of skills and talents, and then use this analysis to seek work opportunities that will fit your skills.

 
Create Your Own Summary

Summarise for yourself:

My high pay-off areas are: (This is where your Skills and Preferences are in alignment - Motivated Talents)
 
 
Skills I want to minimise in future roles:
 
 
Skills I want to develop further:
 
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Your careerPREFERENCES

What you like to do plays an important in your future career satisfaction and success. The careerPREFERENCE profiler analyses your self-reported interests and provides career suggestions for you to explore further.

We have analysed your responses to six primary career areas and 30 specific occupational areas. In order to get a clearer picture, we created your own personal code of career preferences from your responses. We ranked your career interests from your most to your least favourite areas. From your pattern of responses to our test, we are able to help you define where your true interests lie.

 
Your career theme results:

Artistic (A)   25.72%
  Artistic people demonstrate their interest in creative activities either by active involvement or through support and appreciation of these activities. This area includes drama, music, and dance as well as creative writing and the visual arts.
People with an Artistic preference often seek work relating to art, music, entertainment, and writing.
 
Enterprising (E)   15.84%
  Enterprising people are business orientated and generally enjoy selling, whether it is services, products or ideas. They tend to have an entrepreneurial approach and like to make the most of every opportunity. They also often enjoy leading others and may have a strong interest in management positions.
People with an Enterprising preference often seek work relating to business management, sales or politics where an element of business acumen and influence are required.
 
Organising (C)   15.23%
  Individuals attracted to organising work enjoy working with information and often like activities that require close attention to detail. They enjoy dealing with facts and figures, and processes. They often enjoy organising tasks, processes or projects rather than people.
People with a preference for Organising often enjoy using their organisational and administrative skills, often, but not always, in a business setting.
 
Service (S)   15.02%
  Individuals who show a preference for this area like to work with other people and enjoy working with groups. They are likely to enjoy activities that involve caring for people or helping them with their problems. A preference here may also suggest someone who likes teaching, coaching or developing others to fulfil their potential.
People attracted to Service often seek work related to service to others in a variety of settings from hospitality and travel through to counselling and therapy or medical situations.
 
Investigative (I)   14.81%
  Individuals who have a preference for Investigating tend to enjoy analysing, testing, investigating and evaluating facts and information. They tend to enjoy using their conceptual and research skills.
People with this preference often seek work relating to academic research, medical facilities, scientific, computer-related or law enforcement.
 
Practical (R)   13.37%
  Individuals who show a preference for working Practically typically enjoy more hands-on type of activities such as construction, operating machinery and using their hands or bodies. They generally prefer working with things rather than ideas or concepts and may enjoy outdoor activities involving some physical effort or skills.
People with this preference often seek work relating to nature and the outdoors, mechanics, construction or military service.
 
 
Your careerPREFERENCE code is: AEC
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Your Preference Profile

We now look at your responses and analyse not only interest areas but, within these broad areas, which aspects are most appealing. Often you will find appealing aspects across a range of Holland's categories. So, for example, while your primary interest area may be Service, you may also be interested in research and small business creation. This analysis may provide further clues as to where you need to target your future career.

Look carefully at your subcategories, which have been ranked in order of preference below to investigate further career options that could combine uniquely for you. 

 
   
Crafts   5.56%
Entertaining & Performing   5.56%
Writing   5.14%
Design   4.73%
Media & Publishing   4.73%
Office Management   4.53%
Purchasing & Procurement   4.32%
Mechanical   3.91%
Safety & Security   3.91%
Advising   3.7%
Social Science   3.5%
Supporting   3.5%
Information Systems   3.5%
Sales   3.29%
Managing & Supervising   2.88%
Electrical & Electronic   2.88%
Information Technology   2.88%
Administrative Support   2.88%
Small Business & Entrepreneurial   2.67%
Medical & Health   2.67%
Marketing   2.67%
Education & Training   2.67%
Sports & Adventuring   2.47%
Law & Policy Making   2.47%
Customer Service   2.47%
Quality Assurance   2.26%
Nature & Environment   2.06%
Finance   2.06%
Physical Sciences   2.06%
Construction   2.06%
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Career Profile Summary
Your Strongest Interest Area
Artistic Artistic people demonstrate their interest in creative activities either by active involvement or through support and appreciation of these activities. This area includes drama, music, and dance as well as creative writing and the visual arts.
People with an Artistic preference often seek work relating to art, music, entertainment, and writing.
Your Second Interest Area
Enterprising Enterprising people are business orientated and generally enjoy selling, whether it is services, products or ideas. They tend to have an entrepreneurial approach and like to make the most of every opportunity. They also often enjoy leading others and may have a strong interest in management positions.
People with an Enterprising preference often seek work relating to business management, sales or politics where an element of business acumen and influence are required.
Your Highlighted Preference areas
Crafts Interest in making or restoring hand-made or hand-finished products. Artistic activities with a practical, hands-on focus.
Entertaining & Performing Interest in entertaining people through acting comedy or dance.
Writing People who are drawn to writing and journalism appreciate the power of the written word and its abilities to shape other people's ideas.
Design Interest in designing and creating visual objects.
Media & Publishing Interest in activities associated with media and publishing include reporting, journalism, communicating information and ideas in a persuasive or informative manner.
 
Career preference summary

Identifying your preferred career options requires understanding not just your interests but how you would like to work.  So we do not encourage you to focus narrowly on the occupations presented but to use them as a start to your career exploration so that you are able to find the uniquely right opportunity for you.

 

If you are attracted to areas where you feel you have only limited talent, you need to do two things. First, think about why that area attracts you, and whether or not you could get what you are looking for from something more realistic. For example, many people are attracted to creative activities but are not practically creative. It may be that a role that allows them to be creative without being creative per se, would be appropriate – developing a new product or market for example.

 

Interest plays a large part in job satisfaction. If a job meets your interests then you are likely to enjoy it; so, not surprisingly, interests can account for a large part of the finding the right occupation for you. Many people, faced with career decisions, find it difficult to focus on particular areas. It’s also impossible to learn about every type of work that exists, but at the same time, it is important to know you are not shutting out areas that you might find rewarding and enjoyable. The careerPREFERENCE profiler is designed to help target your thinking but should also be a beginning of a journey of exploration not an end point.  It is also important to explore other things to identify what you are suited to, how career options fit with your personality and what occupations would fit with your personal values and career path. (menu here i.e. link to motivators, talents, values) Our on-line assessment questionnaires provide you with an opportunity to match occupations at all these levels.

 

 

© career analysts ltd
online career assessment centre

 
your career profile summary
 
your career motivators
Challenge Motivated by the intellectual, physical or personal challenge from their work
Business Creation Motivated by innovation and business success
your talents
Interpreting Understanding and translating rules, laws, agreements, statistics, art or languages
Researching Study, investigate, apply theory, develop hypotheses, methods, results
your top personal values
Authenticity Expressing oneself in a manner which is true to you
Compassion Awareness and sympathy for the plight of others, and a desire to help.
Confidence Being full of assurance, conveying capability to others
Individuality Having a sense of your own person
Integrity Behaving in accordance with values and ethics
your top career values
Artistic Creativity Engage in creative work in any of several art forms
Earnings Potential Having the expectation of significant future earnings
Independence Be free from the influence or control of others
your career preferences
Artistic Artistic people demonstrate their interest in creative activities either by active involvement or through support and appreciation of these activities. This area includes drama, music, and dance as well as creative writing and the visual arts.
People with an Artistic preference often seek work relating to art, music, entertainment, and writing.
Enterprising Enterprising people are business orientated and generally enjoy selling, whether it is services, products or ideas. They tend to have an entrepreneurial approach and like to make the most of every opportunity. They also often enjoy leading others and may have a strong interest in management positions.
People with an Enterprising preference often seek work relating to business management, sales or politics where an element of business acumen and influence are required.
your targeted career options
Crafts Interest in making or restoring hand-made or hand-finished products. Artistic activities with a practical, hands-on focus.
Entertaining & Performing Interest in entertaining people through acting comedy or dance.
Writing People who are drawn to writing and journalism appreciate the power of the written word and its abilities to shape other people's ideas.
Design Interest in designing and creating visual objects.
Media & Publishing Interest in activities associated with media and publishing include reporting, journalism, communicating information and ideas in a persuasive or informative manner.
© career analysts ltd
online career assessment centre

 

Using your career profile to maximise your career options now

 

From completing the career analysis you have a valuable tool for increasing your motivation and satisfaction through three steps.

1. Review your career fit.

2. Build on your talents.

3. Minimize everything else.

 

 

1. Review your talent fit. 

 

The idea is to align your work with your natural motivations, values, preferences and talents. 

 

This is what your analysis helps you do.  It pinpoints your motivations and preferences and their corresponding talents. Most people find it difficult to articulate what it is they are designed to do. You now have a useful tool for communicating to others what it is you have a talent and passion for.

 

 

2. Build on your talent.

 

It’s all about Alignment.  Align your work with your CAREER profile.  Begin to make adjustments that will allow you to do what you are designed to do.  Some changes will be incremental, and some may be radical. The idea is to spend more of your time using your strengths.  That is where your performance and satisfaction both peak.

 

The natural place to begin is with your job.  Once you are familiar with your CAREER profile ask yourself: 

·      What have you learned about why you do, or don’t do, certain things at work?

·      Which of your responsibilities draw upon your most motivated talents?

·      Which of your highest skills / talents are rarely used?

·      Which of your responsibilities call upon your lesser preferences /talents? What can you do about this?

·      Review your responses to the TALENTS analysis, how does your job fit your preferred way of relating to others?

·      Are the circumstances that motivate you present?

·      Given your unique skill-set, is there a position in your company that is a better fit than your current one? If so, what do you need to do to prepare for it?

·      If you are feeling drained or burned out, which areas are out of alignment?

·      If you feel you are in the wrong role or profession for your skill-set, what can you do about it?

 

Once you have resolved the questions above, it is time to share your motivations and talents with your manager/ mentor or other key stake-holders. Give them with plenty of examples to provide evidence of your skills and potential in these areas.  Also give them ideas about how else you can contribute or ‘add value’ to the organization through using your motivated skills. Plant seeds as to how you could use your skills through additional projects,and be alert to opportunities for developing your preferred skills through training, coaching and practice.  These are high pay-off areas both for yourself – in terms of enjoyment and satisfaction and for your employers, because of your natural capability, you are likely to be both more productive and happier in your work.

 

This is one of the most critical career moves you can make. That’s because if you and your manager talk regularly about your career profile, you greatly increase the likelihood that: 

  • He or she will have realistic expectations of you.
  • You will get assignments / projects and opportunities that play to your strengths.
  • Together you will decide how to handle tasks that require you to work in your least preferred areas.
  • Identify areas where training/experience/mentoring will be most helpful.
  • You will be able to spot opportunities and positions that are a good fit for you.

3. Minimize everything else.

 

We are all designed to do something, but not everything.  A pen is a very useful tool for writing, but is less effective as a screwdriver or tool for opening things (although some of us have been known in desperation to try to use it as such).

It is no different for us.  We have a talent for some things, but not everything.  Don’t beat yourself up about your weaknesses.  Do not spend too much time working on areas of low talent.  Rather focus on building on your talents and motivated skills.

 

If you are in a role which requires you to work in areas where you have little talent, you have some options.

First, have realistic expectations of your performance.  Secondly, create a support system to help you.  For example, one client with little talent for organisation found that careful use of Diary Planner and some training helped her enormously.  Thirdly, try to find a role-model with someone who has high talent in that area. We can improve our enjoyment of a task, when we have developed further skills and strategies to support us. 

 

 

People often are naturally good at something (talented), but it just doesn’t turn them on.  For example, Heather is good with numbers, but she doesn’t go out of her way to find tasks calling for that talent.  Most people have such talents.  But then there are those talents that we really enjoy using.  These are the motivated talents, and this is where the magic is.

 

We use motivated talents every chance we get.  Most of the time we don’t even think about it.  For example, Dave has a motivated talent for conversation, and he naturally engages both friends and strangers in discussions.  He doesn’t consciously determine to do so; it just happens.  It’s natural and unforced.  He enjoys it, and he’s good at it.  That’s the hallmark of a motivated talent.

 

Motivated talents tend to be irrepressible.  They find expression.  In fact, if you’ve ever tried to stifle a motivated talent (either yours or someone else’s) it probably felt like you were trying to hold two dozen ping pong balls under water at the same time.  Motivated talents pop out, even if no one else is asking for them.  And doesn’t that make sense?  After all, it’s what we do well AND enjoy.

 

Well then, wouldn’t the ideal job be one where you can use your motivated talents daily and get paid for it?  Absolutely!  But more on that later.

 

What are your natural motivations?  Shouldn’t your boss know?  You can let him/her know by giving them a copy of you own analysis.

 

This does not mean that anything that falls outside of your  profile can be shirked.  We all have to do things we do not enjoy from time to time.  We have responsibilities and duties that must be honoured. 

 

What it does mean is that we need to have realistic expectations of ourselves.  There is no such thing as the perfect person.  We all need to build on our strengths and minimise our weaknesses. There are a few exceptionally gifted people in this world. The wise person knows he or she has limitations.

 

Know yourself and then let your manager know you.  It’s a win/win situation. If you have your profile, now is the time to start looking at it as a lifelong tool with these next steps: 

 

 

Identify your Marketable Skills Portfolio

  • Analyse your experience
  • Record your top ten talents, generate examples of how you have used these talents
  • Review your resume to assess to what extent your talents are reflected clearly
  • Brainstorm your top achievements with each talent or skill so you can provide evidence at interviews.
  • Record these in your resume under achievements.
  • Review the words used in your resume, do they match the talents you have identified. Consider not only what you do, but how you do it. What is it about you that is unique to the way you do things?  When you use your talent, how is it expressed?Add an …ly to the description of your TALENTS e.g. positively, passionately, enthusiastically, thoroughly.  This will enable you to communicate both what you like to do, but also how you go about doing it.  

In identifying how you use your unique skills, review your list, for the top five, what is it about the way you use this skill.  For example, the TALENT "Interviewing", what is it that you are always most interested to find out. What sparks your attention, what is it that you are most interested in learning?  Another example, with the TALENT "analysing" – how do you go about using this skill – are you highly methodical, creative, ordered – disciplined?  What is unique about the way you go about analysing things – what are you most interested in analysing? 

  • Play private detective, look around you as if you were a Private Investigator.  What is it that a Private Investigator would conclude about you from reviewing your surroundings and preferences – are things immaculate and ordered, or highly creative and inspiring and unique, or warm comfortable and friendly.  What books are on your bookshelf – what is it you most want to know about?  There are real clues for your future in your answers.  These answers will also help you to market yourself and create opportunities that are going to be most fulfilling for you, particularly if you can work in alignment with other facets of your unique motivators, values and personal style.

Generate a list of your personal qualities – what are the unique ways you do things?  Focus not only on what you do, but how you do it and make sure others are aware of what you do best.

 

Final thoughts

 

Creating your future career path is a big project.  Because you are taking on the challenge, you deserve acknowledgement for beginning even the first steps.  Through this process of reflection and evaluation you are undoubtedly closer to achieving your goals and will have already positioned yourself ahead of many of your peers.

 

 

You have gained a blueprint for creating a more fulfilling future and have the terminology to clearly articulate to others your career objectives and desires, both in terms of what will be exciting and fulfilling for you and in relation to what talents you have to offer.

 

There are real payoff's for both you and your employers through using these results to communicate to others.  This can form the cornerstone of your job search, or job enrichment plans. 

 

Our wish is that you will use this as a starting point for fulfilling your career potential.  Make sure that you begin to take some small steps that will move you forward in your career.  If you need further assistance with career action planning, managing your obstacles and creating opportunities, speak to your career coach or visit our website www.careeranalysts.co.nz - we have resources to assist you.

 

Best wishes in your journey.

© career analysts ltd
online career assessment centre